Events

2018 PROVOCATEURS

True/False presents the third year of Provocations: a curated selection of incendiary thinkers. These whip-smart presenters will appear before feature films, injecting a mini “ideas-fest” into True/False, offering challenging ideas in five-minute blasts. These five individuals stand ready to rearrange worldviews with the power of their words.

Aja Romano: Drawing upon her background in fandom, Aja writes about internet culture for Vox. Her reporting provides insights into geek culture from fanfiction enclaves to the dark recesses of Reddit.

Danny Giles: Originally hailing from Columbia, Danny is now based in Chicago where he works as an interdisciplinary artist and educator. His performances at distinguished museums and galleries question the power dynamics of systems.

Miko Revereza: Since relocating from Manila as a child, Miko has lived undocumented in the United States for almost 25 years. His films and writing grapple with his long-­term problems with documentation and the exclusion it imposes.

Nicole He: Nicole uses technology to make art about technology. She playfully transforms both digital mediums and physical objects to explore the relationship between humans and computers with interactivity and humor.

Paul Bloom: A prominent psychologist, Paul’s latest book is Against Empathy: The Case for Rational Compassion. His groundbreaking work convincingly makes counterintuitive arguments about morality, religion, art, and how we understand the world.

 

 

 

 

On the Sunday morning of the Fest, the five piquant Provocateurs, along with some special guests, will gather to present their provocations at the Chautauqua, an event named after the adult education movement popular in the 19th and 20th century. Like early Chautauquas, True/False’s event comes complete with music and storytelling. It will be held at Rhynsburger Theatre and tickets are required for this event. 

Posted February 2, 2018

2018 NEITHER/NOR SERIES

At this year’s True/False, the Fest collaborates with writer and programmer Ashley Clark on a celebration of the Black Audio Film Collective. This retrospective is a part of the festival’s Neither/Nor sidebar, a celebration of groundbreaking film movements that have evolved the discourse surrounding nonfiction cinema. This year’s Neither/Nor program is again presented with the generous support of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

 

 

Formed in 1982, the Collective consisted of seven multidisciplinary and multimedia artists who came together at university and proceeded to collaborate throughout the 1980s and 1990s. With backgrounds in fields such as psychology, sociology and fine art, the Collective approached cinema in a way that was intellectually rigorous, inventive and expressive. Their breakthrough work, 1986’s Handsworth Songs, considered the complex causes and simplistic depictions of civil unrest in Birmingham and London. It aired on Channel 4 and sparked a debate in The Guardian between Salman Rushdie and Stuart Hall, the latter praising the film for its original techniques and for “making us look in new ways.” Later that year, the film received the British Film Institute’s prestigious Grierson Award for Best Documentary.

 

In later works, the Collective explored a vast array of topics, including post-colonialism, Afrofuturism, movement building and migration. As Clark writes, the Collective — namely John Akomfrah, Lina Gopaul, Reece Auguiste, Edward George, Avril Johnson, Trevor Mathison, and Claire Joseph, who was replaced in 1985 by David Lawson — embarked on “a relentless quest to harness the African diaspora’s kaleidoscopic thought-power to combat white supremacy as a historical, economic and conceptual form of oppression.”

 

Who Needs a Heart?

 

During the festival, Clark is presenting four films from the collective’s catalogue: Handsworth Songs, Testament, Twilight City and Who Needs a Heart. These screenings, which begin on February 28 at the Ragtag Cinema and continue throughout the weekend, will be followed by discussions with Black Audio Film Collective members and collaborators, including Reece Auguiste, as well as sound artists Trevor Mathison and Gary Stewart. The full lineup will be announced in mid-February. Additionally, the festival is publishing a monograph featuring new essays by Clark, as well as interviews he’s conducted with Black Audio Film Collective members and associates. This monograph will be available for free at various venues in downtown Columbia and will later be published online.

“We’re beyond thrilled to be working with Ashley, whose brilliant and vibrant monograph draws unsettling parallels between Great Britain circa 1981 and today,” True/False programmer Chris Boeckmann says. “By and large, contemporary nonfiction filmmaking has yet to pursue the exhilarating creative possibilities opened up by the Black Audio Film Collective. We look forward to celebrating and discussing their generous, stimulating work.”

 

Clark is the senior programmer of cinema at BAM in Brooklyn, a position he has occupied since August 2017. He was the programmer of Black Star (BFI Southbank, Oct-Dec 2016; TIFF, Nov-Dec 2017), a major film season dedicated to exploring the range, versatility and power of black actors, and co-programmer of Making Faces on Film: a Collaboration with BFI Black Star (Museum of Modern Art, April 2017), a complementary New York edition. As a journalist, Clark has written extensively on film and culture for The Guardian, Sight & Sound, Reverse Shot, Village Voice and Film Comment; and his first book is Facing Blackness: Media and Minstrelsy in Spike Lee’s Bamboozled (The Critical Press, 2015). Ashley is also a broadcast journalist, and moderator.

 

This is the fifth edition of Neither/Nor, a program dedicated to scholarship and programming of vital movements that shift the boundaries of documentary filmmaking. Earlier editions have explored the legacy of the controversial Mondo film industry and the inspiring work of artists who found creative ways to defy censorship in communist Poland. Head here to read past Neither/Nor monographs.

Posted February 1, 2018

Announcing True Life Fund Film & The Alethea Project

On Wednesday, January 17th at 9:00AM CST we’ll announce the 2018 True Life Fund film and recipient.  We invite members of the press & community to join us for a brief press conference held at The Crossing to discuss the film, the fund, and a new True/False endeavor: The Alethea Project.

The Alethea Project is a 10-week traveling documentary screening series that will take place in large evangelical churches around the Midwest and West. The series will begin in the Fall of 2018 when representatives from True/False and The Crossing visit churches and screen recent nonfiction films with topics that invite robust post-screening discussions among filmmakers, a moderator, and a representative from the church. Film topics will include race in America, climate change, refugees and immigration, healthcare and health crises, the death penalty, guns control, sexuality and gender. 

In 2009, The Crossing joined the True/False Film Fest in presenting the True Life Fund: a crowd-sourced award to honor the subject(s) of a single documentary and thank them for sharing their story. Described in depth by Christianity Today and the New York Times, the True Life Fund allowed these surprising partners to find common values and build a framework of trust and cooperation that benefit both.

The Alethea Project is funded in part by the Bertha Foundation and Impact Partners and is currently seeking additional funders.

 

 

The press conference will be held by True/False co-director David Wilson and Crossing co-pastor Dave Cover. They will discuss the project, partnership, show a clip from the True Life Fund film, and answer questions. The event will also be streamed live on The Crossing’s Facebook page. Both organizations invite those unable to attend to watch online and ask questions via Facebook (@TheCrossingCoMo) or Twitter (@truefalse).

The press conference will take place in room 227 at The Crossing. The Crossing is located at 3615 Southland Drive, Columbia, Missouri 65203. To access room 227 please park in the main lot and enter through the south facing doors. Follow signs to room 227.

 

For more information about the True Life Fund, visit truelifefund.org
For more information about the Alethea Project, visit aletheaproject.org

Posted January 12, 2018

True/False Community Screening: Voyeur

True/False is pleased to announce an off-season screening of the twisty-turny Voyeur, featuring legendary journalist Gay Talese, who  investigates a Colorado motel owner who spied on his guests for decades.

Missouri Theatre, Wednesday, October 18. Doors at 6:30PM, film at 7:00PM.
Come early, we’ll have some exuberant buskers to greet you at the theater.

And be sure to stick around after the film, directors Josh Koury & Myles Kane will be joining us for a Q&A. Kane and Koury were on hand to record some wild encounters between the veteran New York journalist and his enigmatic subject.

This screening is FREE and open to the public and presented in collaboration with the Jonathan B. Murray Center for Documentary Journalism at the Mizzou School of Journalism with many thanks to Netflix.

2018 True/False Super & Silver Passholders are invited to join us for a pre-film reception with the filmmakers from 5:30-6:30PM at Columbia Art League.

Posted September 7, 2017

LOST LETTERS: A TRANSMEDIA HAPPENING

As True/False grows, so does our creative fervor and our ambition for the new. Lately, we’ve drawn increased inspiration from other forms of storytelling, and in 2016 we’ll unveil the Good Wizard arcade. This home of T/F transmedia will be styled after a classic 80s arcade, but filled with virtual reality and participatory installations intent on building a new narrative language for these emerging forms.

As we explore forms of storytelling that are ‘Off the Trail’, we’ve concocted a true transmedia happening. It’s part immersive theater, part live-action video game, part puzzle room. More than anything, this event transforms typical storytelling and challenges you to take an active role in the narrative.

In collaboration with Greenhouse Theatre Project and The Neon Treehouse Art Collective, True/False is thrilled to announce LOST LETTERS.

LOST LETTERS is an hour-long performance, to be experienced in groups of up to 10 people. With your party of other adventurous fest-goers, you will be challenged to work your way through a narrative in 60 minutes or less. Actors and clues of many varieties will guide your way, but completing the experience will rely on creative thinking and teamwork.

Because of the intimate nature of the performance, reservations for LOST LETTERS are ultra-limited. Tickets for a single session will be $38 for all passholders and non-passholders alike. Once you’ve purchased a ticket, you’ll be able to reserve a time slot to attend for a specific hour. Lost Letters will run 8 times per day on the Friday, Saturday, and Sunday of True/False (March 4 – 6). Time slots may be selected starting Feb 15, following the announcement of the film schedule. As this is a team event, you are welcome to sign up with friends (up to 10 people), or you will work as a team with others who have chosen the same time.

Lost Letters ticket details here.

For additional questions, email: boxoffice@truefalse.org
Posted December 14, 2015

Free Community Screenings of FREEDOM SUMMER

In light of recent events at MU, Ragtag Cinema and True/False Film Fest are presenting three special, free, community screenings of FREEDOM SUMMER.
 
Freedom Summer, a documentary by Stanley Nelson (The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution), looks back at the summer of 1964, when the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee organized hundreds of student activist to take segregated Mississippi by storm, registering voters, creating freedom schools, and establishing the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party.

Freedom Summer (Trailer) from Firelight Media on Vimeo.

The screenings will all take place at Ragtag Cinema:

Friday*, November 13 @ 3 PM  

Saturday, November 14 @ 1:30 PM

Sunday, November 15 @ 1:30 PM

*Please note, the Friday screening is specifically for CPS High Schoolers & Educators. We feel this moment in Columbia is a particularly salient one for students, and we’re excited to offer one of these presentations just for our high schools. Please bring school IDs for admission to the Friday screening.

All of our community is welcome to the free screenings on Saturday & Sunday, as space is available.

Posted November 11, 2015

Falling for Rhetoric: an Interview with KILLING THEM SAFELY Director Nick Berardini

On November 18 at the Missouri Theatre, True/False and the Jonathan B. Murray Center for Documentary Journalism (a new addition to the University of Missouri’s Journalism School) are co-presenting a special screening of the documentary Killing Them Safely. Directed by Mizzou Journalism School graduate and Columbia resident Nick Berardini, Killing Them Safely is a gripping, nuanced look at a company, TASER International, as it confronts charges that its eponymous product, an electroshock weapon, has killed people.

For Berardini, the film is the result of an all-consuming six-year journey. In August 2008, a police officer fired a taser at Stanley Harlan, a 23-year-old Moberly resident, who lost consciousness and was pronounced dead two hours later. Then an MU broadcast journalism student working at KOMU (underneath current Murray Center director Stacey Woelfel), Berardini reported on the incident. Shortly thereafter, he started production on the documentary, which took him all across the continent. Berardini learned extensive details about similar cases, acquired many hours of archival material (including deposition footage of TASER co-founders Rick and Tom Smith) and, crucially, secured an interview with TASER International Vice President Steve Tuttle, a peculiar and fascinating spokesman whose performance serves as the film’s backbone. Berardini then edited his engrossing, disturbing, sometimes darkly amusing film alongside True/False alumni Robert Greene (Actress, Fake It So Real), who is now also a Columbia resident, serving as “Filmmaker In Chief” at the Murray Center.

Killing Them Safely premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in April 2015 under a different title, Tom Swift and His Electric Rifle. It received glowing reviews and was then picked up by distributor Sundance Selects, who will release the movie later this year. In early November, T/F programmer Chris Boeckmann met Berardini at Uprise Bakery to discuss his filmmaking journey.

To order tickets to the November 18 screening, visit this page

T/F: I studied in the strategic communications sequence of the journalism school, and you studied in the broadcast journalism sequence. In strat comm, they teach you how to handle interviews with journalists. You need to have three points, and you’re supposed to find sly ways to make them over and over. You know, “That’s an interesting question, Bob, but what I think we really need to be focused on is….” Meanwhile, I assume the broadcast sequence is teaching you how to break the public relations representatives, to get past those three points. I’m curious how you approached this big interview with Steve Tuttle, TASER’s spokesperson. Was he using the same technique I just described?

NB: Yes, he’s definitely in that mold of ‘here are the things we can say that are most effective.’ This is a life-saving tool that prevents the use of deadly force. That’s their very simple mission statement: “Protect truth, protect lives.” He says four or five of the same exact things over and over again. What works about rhetoric in his case is that most of the times when he has to say those four or five things, he says them in a very simple context. It’s a 12-second soundbite for the news. It’s a statement that’s issued to a newspaper. He doesn’t have to sit one-on-one with a person like me.
I didn’t go in with the goal of attack. I didn’t go in looking for “gotcha” moments. Going in, I think my biggest strength was genuine curiosity. If I tell you I want to understand your point of view, I’m going to sit there and try to understand your point of view. So I take everything at face value, and it works for twenty minutes. Over the course of a day, it becomes exhausting. Over the course of four hours, if you can only say the same things over and over and can’t really elaborate, then what are you left with?

T/F: Aside from length, how does your interviewing approach differ from broadcast journalism?

NB: If I were to do a TV news story about TASER International, I would want to go in with all the research done so that if Steve Tuttle says “A,” then I could counter with, “But that’s not true based on this thing.” But I’m making a film that is less about what and more about why. I’m more interested in motivation and process than I am in information.

T/F: I think the trailer is very clever, but I was surprised to see how it sort of throws Steve under the bus in its final seconds.

NB: These guys are true believers.They believe in this way of policing. And when you have a true believer, you have to treat them with the respect of a person going through their own thought process. Steve is a guy who lies for a living, but what is the reason behind the lie? Why does he feel compelled to lie? Because they clearly know at this point that their weapon kills people. It’s a question of what’s the biggest threat. Do we deserve to exist? Is the world a better place because we exist? Steve is not an evil person. He’s a complicated person dealing with complicated subject matter that he simplifies in his mind to protect the simplest goal, which is that we must survive because the world is better with us than without us.

T/F: You use a lot of deposition footage where John Burton, a lawyer featured prominently throughout the film, questions TASER co-founders Rick and Tom Smith. How does his approach to interviewing differ from your own?

NB: The movie is about this company—its history, its rise, its controversy and where it is today—and for the movie to work, they need a good adversary. The lawyers are great adversaries. They’re the only thing that truly threatens the company. When you listen to their interviewing style, you realize they’re there because they want to win. They do amazing work, but they wouldn’t sit there if it was a bad case. They’re taking cases they’re pretty confident they’re going to win. When they’re questioning, they’re trying to prove a very technical or specific point in legalese in order to win a case six months down the road in trial. To prove negligence. I’m not trying to prove anything. I’m trying to enlighten myself and the audience to a way of thinking, to a point of view that they’re not familiar with, that’s different from their own. The styles are different because the intentions are different.

T/F: When you were studying the lives of Rick and Tom Smith, did you find a way to relate to them on a personal level?

NB: Yes, there’s definitely a tunnel vision aspect to both of us. In many ways, this movie is a commentary about all of us. It’s about the way we see ourselves—the best version of ourselves—versus what we really are. And I constantly experienced that disconnect with my film. For years, I told myself this movie is going to be amazing for all these reasons. And you think that way because the sheer panic that sets in when you realize it’s not going as planned could put you on the verge of a nervous breakdown. Especially when you’ve put, like I have and like they did, your life into something. In order to deal with the collateral damage they created, TASER International started telling little lies that became much bigger over time. Once the consequences were no longer hypothetical, there were two ways out: own up to it, face it and admit that you made a mistake, or cling to the best version of yourself, that idea that you had when you started.

T/F: You started this film as a reaction to a very upsetting local news story. There’s been a lot of reporting on TASER International in the years since.

NB: The film is still timely and relevant. It’s not because policing issues are at the forefront of the news. This is a story that’s as old as human beings. It’s about the promise of technology, the promise of innovation, the desire to want things to succeed before we’ve fully through the consequences of those things because they’re new and the consequences are hypothetical. This is the ultimate absurd example because it’s an electric weapon. It has the most clear hypothetical ‘what can go wrong’ questions attached to it.
The film is also about what you do when you’re at this crossroads and your livelihood and your way of thinking is on the line. And why do we constantly take things at face value from the people who have the most to lose? That’s what most blows my mind. I don’t want to say everyone believed them, but the law enforcement community jumped on board with the company right away. And the company was the only one providing information about their product. Obviously they had the most to the lose yet were somehow the most trustworthy. I just don’t get it.

T/F: Killing Them Safely explores different problems, but it doesn’t offer any solutions.

NB: The traditional way of making an issue film, and what distributors typically want, is to offer the simplest presentation of that issue so people can then get active, sign a petition and feel good about themselves. There are films that should use this approach. But the problem with making a movie like that is that movies should be three-dimensional. They should be more than just bullet points. And what makes that impossible with Killing Them Safely is that it’s partly past tense. It’s retrospective. It’s about something that has already happened and the consequences of what’s already happened. There’s no way to rally the troops and take 500,000 tasers off the streets in the United States. That’s not possible. The movie is not going to make the same mistake by offering a simple solution when there isn’t one.

T/F: But do you want the film to have any sort of social impact?

NB: I certainly do broadly. I’m no anti-capitalist, but we’ve taken capitalism to this extreme now where we’re surprised when the actor with the most to lose acts in self-interest. And it’s not just the general public being surprised, it’s the fact that our regulatory system for something like tasers is basically the product liability system. Which inherently means someone is going to die before anyone does anything about this thing. This is an electrical weapon, it’s not a Lego. This is a weapon used in violent situations and yet it’s regulated the same way a toaster is. That goes back to an attitude of victim-blaming that we have and a distrust of the tort system that doesn’t make a lot of sense to me. While there’s excessive litigation between individuals, corporations have insane protection from lawsuits. People have no idea how difficult it is to bring a product liability case and be successful. And it has to be that way because the system has to inspire ingenuity. Because most people aren’t making weapons, most people are making other products.
I don’t think there’s some sort of broad overhaul that needs to happen; taser is a very niche product. But I also think the film is a condemnation of the way we place trust in those acting in self-interest when they’re operating under the guise of business, job-provider, life-saver. We just fall for rhetoric way too easily. So it’s more about a general skepticism about people whose job it is to be skeptical— police administrators, politicians, city council members when they buy these weapons — than it is about writing a law that could prevent this sort of thing.

Posted November 4, 2015

Locally produced Taser documentary Killing Them Safely screens Nov. 18 at Missouri Theatre

TOMSWIFT_web_1

On November 18, True/False and the Jonathan B. Murray Center for Documentary Journalism at the University of Missouri are thrilled to co-present a special screening of the new documentary KILLING THEM SAFELY at the Missouri Theatre. Directed by local filmmaker Nick Berardini, KILLING THEM SAFELY is a gripping, nuanced study of Taser International as they confront charges that their eponymous product, which was sold to police forces as a non-lethal defense alternative, has killed civilians. KILLING THEM SAFELY premiered to great acclaim at the Tribeca Film Festival earlier this year (under its former title, TOM SWIFT AND HIS ELECTRIC RIFLE) and was picked up by distributor Sundance Selects, who will release the film in theaters nationwide. Berardini will participate in a post-screening Q&A at the November 18 screening, which starts at 7:30pm (doors open at 7pm). Tickets cost $10 and will be available at www.truefalse.org starting October 1.

In recent years, mid-Missouri’s growing film community has produced several outstanding works of nonfiction cinema, including Andrew Droz Palermo & Tracy Droz Tragos’ Sundance-winning RICH HILL and Chad Freidrichs’ THE PRUITT-IGOE MYTH. KILLING THEM SAFELY, directed by University of Missouri Journalism School graduate Berardini, co-edited and co-photographed by former Columbia resident Nathan Truesdell and produced by Columbia residents Brock Williams (Boxcar Films) and Jamie Gonçalves, is the latest example. Following its Tribeca premiere, the film screened at North America’s largest documentary festival, Hot Docs. Then, this summer, both Berardini and Gonçalves (a True/False core staff member) were named to Filmmaker Magazine’s esteemed 25 New Faces of Independent Film list.

For Berardini, the film is the result of a winding, all-consuming six-year journey. In August 2008, a police officer fired a taser at Stanley Harlan, a 23-year-old Moberly resident, who lost consciousness and was pronounced dead two hours later. Then an MU broadcast journalism student working at KOMU (underneath current Murray Center director Stacey Woelfel), Berardini reported on the incident. Shortly thereafter, he started production on the documentary, which took him all across the continent. Berardini learned extensive details about similar cases, acquired many hours of archival material and, crucially, secured an interview with Taser International Vice President Steve Tuttle, a peculiar and fascinating spokesman whose performance serves as the film’s backbone. Berardini then edited his engrossing, disturbing, sometimes darkly amusing film alongside True/False alumni Robert Greene (ACTRESS, FAKE IT SO REAL), who is now Filmmaker In Chief at the Murray Center.

For more information about the film, check out interviews with Berardini at Tribeca Film, Newsweek, and Business Insider. Berardini also penned this piece for The Daily Beast.

Tickets available here.

Posted September 28, 2015

Announcing the Dawdle Aireoke Challenge

At this year’s Boone Dawdle (August 15th – get your passes before they’re gone!), we’re embracing our inner headbangers and throwing a special metal-themed “aireoke” challenge for six lucky teams – and one very lucky audience. Beyond mere air guitar or lip synching, this metal mayhem calls upon our contestants to form an entire air band – riffing, strutting, and flailing in synch to a heavy metal anthem of their choice. Each band member plays along in time with the song (air guitar, air drums, air bass, air keyboard, etc), in what is sure to be an epic, high energy performance!

Before the film begins, these six “bands” of Dawdle attendees will strum, pound, and wail their way to victory. Winners will be selected by audience approval, with the film’s producer, Tom Davis, as the final judge and official tie-breaker. Victors will receive accolades and glory – as well as sweet prizes, like Busker Bands to the 2016 festival, and a totally sweet trophy from local artist and T/F stalwart Michael Marcum. Runners up will also get a (sweet) prize (TBA).

See the application for additional rules & guidance: HERE

Applications will be accepted between July 17 and August 3.

For inspiration, we’ll be posting some of our favorite videos on our Facebook page between now and the Dawdle. Check out this YouTube playlist to get you into the spirit of the event. You’ll find classic rock/metal videos, as well as a performance or two by Unlocking the Truth, the band featured in the Dawdle film.

That film, Breaking a Monster, is a heavy metal coming-of-age story. Discovered as pre-teens busking in Times Square, the three members of Unlocking the Truth deal not only with taking their first steps into the complexities of adulthood, but simultaneously making the leap to being professional musicians. With a savvy music industry vet as a manager, can they navigate their way to a million dollar record deal while avoiding the pitfalls of fame and the dark side of the music biz?

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with producer Tom Davis. For more pre-Dawdle fun, watch the short film that inspired Breaking a Monster:

Unlocking The Truth – Malcolm Brickhouse & Jarad Dawkins from The Avant/Garde Diaries on Vimeo.

Posted July 17, 2015

Help True/False’s Education Program Receive a $25,000 Grant From State Farm Neighborhood Assist

True/False’s education program has been selected as one of the top 200 causes in the running for State Farm’s Neighborhood Assist program. Now we need your help to get us in to the top 40 so that we receive a $25,000 grant! Simply go here and cast your vote for True/False For All! You can vote each and every day until June 3. You get 10 votes a day, but if you check the box to use your remaining votes you can cast all ten at once.

Please vote often and help us spread the word about this campaign. It may seem silly, but this money will be very important to the future of our education program. In the days ahead, we’ll be sharing testimonials about what these efforts have meant to students and teachers in our community.

Over the past 12 years, our education program has offered unique field trips to thousands of students, organized hundreds of filmmaker meetings with students, teachers, and community groups and engaged thousands of people in the True Life Fund, our annual philanthropic effort thanking the subject of a documentary film. In the months and years to come we want to cultivate deeper, year-round ties with community organizations, create media-literate, artistic, savvy high school and college students who encounter other cultures in a meaningful way and nurture the appreciation of theatrical experience as important part of public life.

Please take a few minutes and help us now.

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Students chat with director Liz Garbus after our educational screening of What Happened, Miss Simone? at the Missouri Theatre

 

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Students participate in DIY Day at T/F 2015

Posted May 20, 2015
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